Articles by: Morgan McNeill

Oil Beetle (genus Meloe)

This strange looking beetle is likely the Black Meloe (Meloe niger). They are active primarily in April and May. As you might guess from their short, stubby wings, the adults […]

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Green Lacewing (family Chrysopidae)

While these beautiful and delicate looking insects are harmless to humans, they are very capable predators that always seem to be hungry. And since they tend to feed on other […]

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Stonefly (order Plecoptera)

If you scour along the riverbank you’re likely to find molts (or exuviae) of dragonfly, damselfly, stonefly nymphs (naiads) clinging to rocks and vegetation. We’re not 100% sure what’s going […]

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Mayfly (order Ephemeroptera)

Peter discovered this mayfly going through its final molt in his kitchen. It must have flown into his house, which may give you pause, how did it have wings before its […]

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An Owlet Moth (Annaphila danistica)

These day-flying moths are very small, only about the size of a fingernail. They fly early in the spring, from March to late May in the Pacific Northwest. Their range […]

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Flea Beetle (Altica sp.)

As far as beetles go, these guys are pretty small (ranging from 1/16 to a whopping 1/4 of an inch). Thanks to oversized hind legs, they are good jumpers—hence the […]

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Plume Moth in the family Pterophoroidea

Plume moths are members of the micromoth group and have unusually modified wings. At rest, they look like a capital “T” or like a glider. They resemble a piece of dried […]

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